Native and Hybrid Crossvine

Our native crossvine

Our native crossvine

Tangerine Beauty Crossvine flowers

Tangerine Beauty Crossvine flowers

Tangerine Beauty Crossvine along a chain link fence

Tangerine Beauty Crossvine along a chain link fence

Our native crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) is a beauty in the woodlands around Birmingham. Its thin stems run up trees in its native habitat and give us the beautiful yellow-brown spring flowers. I do not consider it a vigorous vine, but one that has long shoots and can be covered with flowers each spring. It is easy to grow and likes a bit of shade. But on the other hand, the selection Tangerine Beauty is vigorous and once established can be a very fast grower in good fertile soil. But as you can see, this one growing on a chain link fence on the back side of Railroad Park,  is a stunning profusion of tangerine flowers. I did the old Biltmore Estate trick of putting three vines that bloom at different times on one trellis, and the Tangerine Beauty outgrew and simply smothered the other two vines. Don’t worry about containing it or shaping it, just wait until after it flowers to prune it. Once a heavy frost appears in fall, the mass of stems are a dull brown and seem to fade away in winter. I have one now in poor compacted soil, and it grows rather slowly and still blooms beautifully. But the poor soil is a deterrent to its typical rapid growth

John Floyd

John Floyd has been gardening--and learning about Birmingham area gardening--for more than 30 years. In addition to his day-to-day experience, John has degrees in horticulture from Auburn and Clemson Universities and was Editor-in-Chief of Southern Living.

6 thoughts on “Native and Hybrid Crossvine

  1. thank you for your post it helped me a lot, I bought this beauty, along with an orange jubilee, and a Madame Galen Trumpet vine that I just purchased for my 50 foot by 6 foot high cinder block fence, I only have wild land on the other side. I am hoping these vines will add beauty to the wall. is it too much vines?

  2. Dr. John – is this also referred to as a “Trumpet” Vine? I have a 4-ft. wood fence that I want to decorate with changing color. A friend recommended a “trumpet” vine for the shadier side – and common Jasmine for the sunnier side. Does that sound like a workable setup?
    Thanks,
    NancyB

    • There is another orange vine commonly called Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans), that blooms in the summer and has orange trumpets. It is sometimes called Cow Itch vine, and while both have trumpet-like flowers, they are very different when they bloom and also the leaves. Trumpet Vine leaves are multisection and large, while Tangerine Beauty Crossvine is much smaller and not at all the same shape. Hope this explains the difference. Trumpet vine likes full sun and so does both the Carolina Jessamine or the Confederate Jasmine. See the post on both. I think they can all take a bit of shade but not dense shade. Let me know if you have other questions.

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