Unique Stonework Installed by Owner

Entry to this foliage garden in a radius pattern countered with a turned square in the center. The four blue elements on the corners of the square are glass insulators.

Entry to this foliage garden is a radius pattern countered with a turned square in the center. The four blue elements on the corners of the square are glass insulators.

The second pad in the garden with the repeat of the turned square to echo the entry pad

The second pad in the garden with the repeat of the turned square to echo the entry pad

This third half square transitions the blue stone patio at the corner of the house to the back yard. This third stone path was just completed last year . That is the reason its stone has not aged as much as the other two.

This third half-square transitions the blue stone patio at the corner of the house to the back yard. This third stone path was just completed last year. That is the reason its stone has not aged as much as the other two.

I visited a really unique garden this afternoon. And while the plant collection is “wow,” I wanted you to enjoy the three stone paths the owners built themselves. All three were done with great care. They selected the rock from a quarry near Oneonta. Now, they did not try to do it all at once, and part of the joy of their garden is to enjoy what they have done together and adding things in stages. It is almost impossible to design, or much less find someone to take the time and care to lay such intricate stone work. This did not happen overnight, but they had a pattern plan and a conceptual look they strived to accomplish. In fact, the light color half-square stone path was just added last year, and has not aged as long as the others. I think this is the kind of unique look, but still unified by the material and pattern, that makes this a memorable garden and proud homeowners.

John Floyd

John Floyd has been gardening--and learning about Birmingham area gardening--for more than 30 years. In addition to his day-to-day experience, John has degrees in horticulture from Auburn and Clemson Universities and was Editor-in-Chief of Southern Living.

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